Subscribe RSS

Archive for the Category "Chandigarh Tricity"

Chandigarh Railway Station is All Set for Renovation Jul 02

Chandigarh railway station is all set for renovation to the tune of Rs 1 crore, where in it will have a new over bridge and a wider circulating area for upgrading the facilities.

Now, the frequent travellers will not complain about lack of space at the station, as the plan to improving the circulating area is in the pipeline.

The Railway Ministry will probably give a green signal for renovating the railway station in the Railway budget likely to be announced on Friday.

At present, the station has 1-ft over bridge, which gets crowded in the peak hours, making it difficult for the passengers to boarding trains.

The divisional railway manager, HP Jaggi said: “The present over bridge connects platforms No. 2, 3, 4, and 5 is very narrow. When the trains reach, the passengers face problems crossing the bridge. Thus, another foot over bridge is likely to be constructed on the right side of the station for which around Rs 80 lakh will be invested.”

The parking lot of the station had been revamped recently, he added.

Meanwhile, the railway station will soon have packed meals available for the commuters. Sources said the authorities concerned had approved a vendor who would be selling the packed meals in the circulating area.

Public Transport Service to be Revived by Chandigarh May 30

To streamline the public transport service between Chandigarh, Panchkula and Mohali, the Chandigarh administration has drafted a plan to run around 1,200 AC and non-AC radio taxis and 1,500 LPG autorickshaws soon.

It has been agreed upon with Haryana and Punjab transport departments to introduce 200 AC taxis and equal number of non-AC taxis. The taxis would be white with the insignia of the open hand. The AC cab service at Rs 15 per km is already on schedule, while the non-AC service at Rs 8 per km is going to start soon.

Secretary, State Transport Authority, Vandana Disodia, said everything had been finalised and the service would be started in a day or two. As soon as they got the draft policy, permission would be given to non-AC cabs.

A decision in this regard has also been taken at a meeting attended by the State Transport Commissioner, Haryana, the Director Transport, Chandigarh, and the GM of Haryana Roadways to countersign the permits of autorickshaws.

The number of autorickshaws to be countersigned by the respective states and the UT has been fixed at 500 each. The administration also plans to introduce radio autorickshaw service, wherein dialling a four-digit number would bring eco-friendly autorickshaws, fitted with the GPS system, on your doorstep for Rs 5 per km. The Centre has given its nod for 100 AC Volvo buses and 60 non-AC buses for Chandigarh.

Meanwhile, the Chandigarh Government Transport Workers Union yesterday protested against the administration’s move of entering into an agreement with neighbouring states. Raj Kumar, general secretary of the union, said the administration had shown discrepancies while signing the agreement with the Haryana government.

“As per the agreement with Punjab, no state-owned bus would ply on the Chandigarh route beyond the ISBT-17 or ISBT-43. But Haryana buses have been allowed to ply on city routes,” he said.

24×7 radio auto service in Chandigarh May 09

Finding autos will be just a call away. The Chandigarh administration has mooted a proposal to introduce 24×7 radio auto service in the city, the first in the country. What is more - the refurbished autos will be equipped with Global Positioning System (GPS) connected with GSM/CDMA/landline network and other facilities for the comfort and safety of passengers.

The eco-friendly LPG/CNG-run green colour autos with yellow topping will have an electronic display unit showing “hired” or “vacant”.

Though the fare has not been fixed as yet, sources in the transport department said it would be somewhere near Rs 5 per km. This implies that it will be the cheapest public transport available in Chandigarh after the CTU buses.

Private firms having transport background will operate these autos. The officials said that expression of interest from interested parties would be invited after the Model Code of Conduct is over. The operators will have their own control rooms, which will be in constant touch with the auto drivers.

This service will be available in three convenient ways - on call by dialling the four-digit number, by hiring them from their designated locations or by stopping them on road.

Confirming this, Home Secretary-cum-Secretary Transport Ram Niwas said the proposal would be materialised soon after the elections are over in Chandigarh.

“It will be beneficial and safe for the general public, especially women and children, as the vehicle will be driven by the designated person only. Since plans are there to have a GPS system in the vehicle, this will enable us to know the location of the vehicle. Secondly, it will help in ending the monopoly of the existing auto drivers who ask for undue fares. Thirdly, these vehicles will be available all day and night. Besides, this scheme will help us generate employment and help us switching over to LPG autos soon,” he said.

Vandana Disodia, Secretary, State Transport Authority, said that under the Motor Vehicle Act, 1988, auto-rickshaws come under the category of contract carriage and their registration numbers could be reserved for these vehicles. “An operator interested to be a part of the scheme will have a minimum fleet of 10 brand new LPG/CNG auto-rickshaws. The registration will be done by the STA as per the Chandigarh motor vehicle norms,” she said.

The STA will monitor that the auto-rickshaw should comply with the stipulated conditions like the vehicle must have electronic fare meter on its front panel, besides the first-aid box and fire extinguishers. “It will be the liability of the operating firm to ensure that the drivers have valid driving licence, good behaviour and proper uniform,” she added.

Planning and Architecture of Modern Chandigarh Jan 27

Planning and Architecture of Modern Chandigarh

Planning and Architecture of Modern Chandigarh

Le Corbusier’s plan of modern Chandigarh Taking over from Albert Mayer, Le Corbusier produced a plan for Chandigarh that conformed to the modern city planning principles of Congres International d’Architecture Moderne CIAM, in terms of division of urban functions, an anthropomorphic plan form, and a hierarchy of road and pedestrian networks. This vision of Chandigarh, contained in the innumerable conceptual maps on the drawing board together with notes and sketches had to be translated into brick and mortar. Le Corbusier retained many of the seminal ideas of Mayer and Nowicki, like the basic framework of the master plan and its components: The Capitol, City Center, besides the University, Industrial area, and linear parkland. Even the neighborhood unit was retained as the basic module of planning. However, the curving outline of Mayer and Nowicki was reorganized into a mesh of rectangles, and the buildings were characterized by an “honesty of materials”. Exposed brick and boulder stone masonry in its rough form produced unfinished concrete surfaces, in geometrical structures. This became the architectural form characteristic of Chandigarh, set amidst landscaped gardens and parks.

The initial plan had two phases: the first for a population of 150,000 and the second taking the total population to 500,000. Le Corbusier divided the city into units called “sectors”, each representing a theoretically self-sufficient entity with space for living, working and leisure. The sectors were linked to each other by a road and path network developed along the line of the 7 Vs, or a hierarchy of seven types of circulation patterns. At the highest point in this network was the V1, the highways connecting the city to others, and at the lowest were the V7s, the streets leading to individual houses. Later a V8 was added: cycle and pedestrian paths. The Palace Assembly, designed by Le Corbusier The city plan is laid down in a grid pattern. The whole city has been divided into rectangular patterns, forming identical looking sectors, each sector measures 800 m x 1200 m. The sectors were to act as self-sufficient neighbourhoods, each with its own market, places of worship, schools and colleges - all within 10 minutes walking distance from within the sector. The original two phases of the plan delineated sectors from 1 to 47, with the exception of 13 (Number 13 is considered unlucky). The Assembly, the secretariat and the high court, all located in Sector - 1 are the three monumental buildings designed by Le Corbusier in which he showcased his architectural genius to the maximum. The city was to be surrounded by a 16 kilometer wide greenbelt that was to ensure that no development could take place in the immediate vicinity of the town, thus checking suburbs and urban sprawl; hence is famous for its greenness too.

While leaving the bulk of the city’s architecture to other members of his team, Le Corbusier took responsibility for the overall master plan of the city, and the design of some of the major public buildings including the High Court, Assembly, Secretariat, the Museum and Art Gallery, School of Art and the Lake Club. Le Corbusier’s most prominent building, the Court House, consists of the High court, which is literally higher than the other, eight lower courts. Most of the other housing was done by Le Corbusier’s cousin Pierre Jeanneret, the English husband and wife team of Maxwell Fry and Jane Drew, along with a team of nine Indian architects. The city in its final form, while not resembling his previous city projects like the Ville Contemporaine or the Ville Radieuse, was an important and iconic landmark in the history of town planning. It continues to be an object of interest for architects, planners, historians and social scientists. Chandigarh has two satellite cities: Panchkula and Mohali. Sometimes, the triangle of these three cities is collectively called the Chandigarh Tricity.